panuncula (l) - thread wound upon a bobbin (a cylinder or cone holding thread, yarn, or wire) + peninsular.

gumboots (i.e. Wellingtons) + bottes (French) - boots.

rude yelling + FDV: [yellow green blue red orange violet hair all in his [broadginger his civic chollar &] allbufishirt like a redwary redyellan orangeman in his violet indigonation [by to the whole length longth of the strength strongth of his bowman's bill.]]  

indignation - anger at what is regarded as unworthy or wrongful + red, yellow, green, blue, orange, violet, indigo.

whole length - exhibited at full length + FDV: by to the whole length longth of the strength strongth of his bowman's bill

bowman - a man who shoots with a bow + Strongbow, Richard - led the Anglo-Norman invasion of Ireland in 1170. He married Eve MacMurrough and ruled Leinster till he died in 1176. He was buried in Christ Church Cathedral; his tomb was long a Dublin landmark, a place where debts were paid, business done + In the Odyssey Odysseus is recognized when he alone has the strength to string his own bow. 

bill - a halberd (weapon); a note of charges for goods delivered or services rendered, in which the cost of each item is separately stated

clop - to clap; a blow; a sharp sound

hitch - a contrivance for fastening something, a catch + FDV: And he put his rude hand to his hackneyseat E C Haitch.

ordered + ord (Norwegian) - word + ordure - excrement, dung, filth.

shut up shop - to discontinue the work one is doing

dippy - mad, insane, crazy + FDV: And he ordered And his thick speech spuck for her to shut up shop, dummy.

duppy - name among West Indian Negroes for a ghost or spirit + dup (Archaic) - to open + dupe (Serbian) - ass + "... northeast wall [of HCE and ALP's room], with the window looking into the backyard, toward Phoenix Park and Dublin bay beyond... The northeast is also the historic source of Viking invasions, and indeed the window, like the door, is often a focus of the dreamer's anxities about the assaults from the outer world, anxities amplified by the hailstones which early beat against his window and windowboards. Those boards, mentioned at 316.04 for their effectiveness in 'aerian insulation resistance' go through a number of changes. 583.14-15 indicates that they are 'Persian blinds', a kind of sturdy outdoor version of Venetian blinds, consisting of horizontal slats or planks set in a frame. They are two in number, hinged on either side of the window and fastened by a clasp. Three thing to bear in mind about them are, first, that tending them is the manservant's responsibility (at 23.05 for instance, he is ordered to close them)..." (John Gordon: Finnegans wake: a plot summary)

put up the shutters - to stop doing business + FDV: And the dummy shot the shutter down and they all drank free.

Perkun - Lithuanian thunder-god. Perun is the Slavic one. 

kurun (Breton) - thunder

barg (Persian) - thunder

griauja (Lithuanian) - it thunders

gk grliy or (Turkish) - thundering sky

grom grmi (Serbian) - thunder thunders

guntur (Malay) - thunder

thruma (ON) - thunder

thuna (Rumanian) - thunder

radi (Kiswahili) - thunder

dill (Arabic) - thunder

failitily (Samoan) - thunder

bumulloj (Albanian) - thunder

ukkonen (Finnish) - thunder

break free + Stock ending of Irish fairy tales: 'They put on the kettle and they all had tea' + 'Here the story fell to the sea' on 204(a) derives from the Senegalese equivalent of the Irish 'and they all drank tea', the closing formula of a tale without a proper ending: 'Here the tale goes for a walk and falls into the sea' (Robbert-Jan Henkes).

armour - protective covering made of metal and used in combat + pot valiant (Slang) - courageous through liquor + Ulysses.15.4402: 'Doctor Swift says one man in armour will beat ten men in their shirts' (from Swift's The Drapier's Letters: 'Eleven Men well armed will certainly subdue one Single Man in his Shirt') + (contraceptives).

shurt - short + shirts

illiterate - unfurnished with letters, not written upon, unwritten + FDV: And this that was the first peace of porter of illiterative porthery in the whole flooding.     

portery - citizenship or burghership in a Flemish or Dutch city + pottery - the manufacture of earthen vessels + pother - disturbance, tumult, noise + porthor (Welsh) - doorkeeper, porter.

floody - pertaining to the flood

flatuous - windy; generating wind

Kirsche (ger) - cherry

tiler - one who covers the roofs of buildings with tiles, a tile-layer; Freemasonry: (Usually tyler.) The doorkeeper who keeps the uninitiated from intruding upon the secrecy of the lodge or meeting.

unclose - to make open; to cause to open; to disclose, make known, reveal + ('the' at the end of FW) + 'How Kersse the Tailor Made a Suit of Clothes for the Norwegian Captain'.

narwhal - a type of whale with a large projecting, spiral tusk

saw - p. od see + so far

betune (Anglo-Irish) - between + Genesis 9:12: 'the covenant which I make between me and you'.

git - get + get it up (Slang) = bander (French Slang) - to have an erection + get the wind up - to get into a state of alarm or funk + FDV: The prankwench was to get hold the her dummy dummyship & the jiminies was to keep their peace peacewave & the Sir Howther was to get the wind up.

gehorsam (ger) - obedient + (capability of hearing).

burger (Dutch) = Burger (ger) - citizen.

felicitate - to make happy

polis - a Greek city-state; police, policeman + Obidientia civium urbis felicitas (l) - Citizens' Obedience is City's Happiness (The municipal motto of Dublin) + Heliopolis.

culprit - prisoner at the bar, the accused [Joyce's note: 'culprit'] + O felix culpa! (l) - 'O happy fault' (St Augustine's comment on the fall of man) + {Adam and Eve's disobedience (the "happy fault") is contrasted with the obedience of the citizens of Dublin enjoined in the city's motto, which is alluded to in the preceding lines}

nicky (Czech) - nulls, zeros + ex nihilo nihil fit (l) - out of nothing comes nothing (Persius: Satires 1.84: 'De nihilo nihilum': 'Nothing can come out of nothing').

malum (l) - evil; apple (Eve's) + malo (Pan-Slavonic) - a little, wee + ex nihilo malo venit nihilum bonum (l) - out of nothing evil comes nothing good.

Michaelmass (29 September) + mickle (Dialect) - much + amassed.

bonum (l) - good + ex malo bonum fit (l) - out of evil good is made (Joyce, Letters 13-05-1927, to Harriet Shaw Weaver) + SDV: O phenix culprit! Ex nicklow cometh good.

rill - a small stream, a brook, rivulet + hill (*E*) and rill (*A*) + SDV: Hill and rill once in company [billeted], we see less be proud of.

billet - to enter in a list, assign the place to, locate, to lodge + Sons & Company, Limited - Arthur Guinness, Sons & Company, Ltd (Joyce, Letters 13-05-1927 to Harriet Shaw Weaver).

let's be proud of + "be proud of them but naturally, as hill (go up it) as river (jump it)" (Joyce, Letters 13-05-1927 to Harriet Shaw Weaver).

breast high - to the height of the breast; said in hunting of the scent when it is so strong that the hounds go at a racing pace with their heads erect  

bestride - to sit upon with the legs astride, to ride, mount (a horse, etc.) + (surmount a hill, bestride a stream) + SDV: Breast it high and bestride!

Norronesen (Old Norse) = Old Norse, warrior (Joyce, Letters 13-05-1927 to Harriet Shaw Weaver) + norroenn (Old Norse) - norse.

Irenean = Irish born; peace [eirene] (Joyce, Letters 13-05-1927 to Harriet Shaw Weaver) + eirēnē: (Greek) peace.

secrest - to sequestrate goods + secret + SDV: but only for that they will not speak breathe the secret secrest of their silentness sourcelessness.

quarry - a surface excavation for extracting stone or slate + The quarry and the silex (flint) suggest HCE silent (Joyce, Letters 13-05-1927 to Harriet Shaw Weaver).

silex (l) - rock, flint + quare siles (l) - why are you silent? + SDV: Quarry silex, Homfries Homfrie Noanswa? Undy festiknees, Livia Noanswa?

n h-annsa (Irish) - not hard (formula for answering riddles) + "No answer" (Mark Twain, Tom Sawyer, p. 1.) + Albert Nyanza (Joyce, Letters 13-05-1927 to Harriet Shaw Weaver) + Albert Nyanza - Lake Albert, in East Africa, one of the principal sources of the Nile.

undy - waving, wavy

gentian - any plant belonging to the genus Gentiana

festiness - confinement, durance + unde gentium festines? (l) - where the dickens are you hurrying from? (Joyce, Letters 13-05-1927, to Harriet Shaw Weaver) + Festy King [FW 085.23].

nyanza (Bantu) - a lake + VICTORIA NYANZA - Lake Victoria, in central Africa, the source (through the Albert Nynaza) of the White Nile, long-sought and bitterly disputed by explorers and geographers in the 19th century. John Speke was the 1st European to see Lake Victoria, in 1858, and the 1st to discover its Nile outlet, in 1862. 

Wolken (ger) - clouds, cloud- + wolkenkap (Dutch) - cloud cap (the Hill of Howth is often cloud-capped) + woollen cap of clouds (Joyce, Letters 13-05-1927, to Harriet Shaw Weaver).

frown - to present somber or menacing appearence + he is crowned with the frown of the deaf (Joyce, Letters 13-05-1927, to Harriet Shaw Weaver) + SDV: Wolkencap is on his head him, frowned;

audio (l) - to listen + -urient - desiring, characterized by desire + audi urio (l) - I long to hear, I desire to hear + Vulgate Psalms 113:6: 'Aures habent et non audient' (l) - 'They have ears, but they hear not' + 'Audi urio (I long to hear) Es urio (I long to eat)' (Joyce, Letters 13-05-1927, to Harriet Shaw Weaver).

eavesdrop - to listen secretly + his house's e(a)ve ALP water (Joyce, Letters 13-05-1927, to Harriet Shaw Weaver) + Joyce's note: 'he would hear (audiebat)'.

mous = pl. of mou - mouth + mouse + mous = Chaucerian form to suggest distance in time (Joyce, Letters 13-05-1927, to Harriet Shaw Weaver).

at hand - near in time or place + SDV: audiurient, he would hear evesdrop were it mice mouse at hand, were it dinned din of bottles [in the far ear].  

din - a loud noise; particularly a continued confused or resonant sound, which stuns or distresses the ear + din the noise of an angry armed djinn spirit, to suggest distance in space (Joyce, Letters 13-05-1927, to Harriet Shaw Weaver).

air + far east (Joyce, Letters 13-05-1927, to Harriet Shaw Weaver).

murk - to grow dark, to darken; darkness + mark - to notice or observe + SDV: Murk, his vales are darkling!

vale - a dale or valley, esp. one which is comparatively wide and flat + eyes

darkle - to grow dark, to lurk in the dark + His hill begins to be clouded over in the effort to hear (Joyce, Letters 13-05-1927, to Harriet Shaw Weaver).

to (gr) - the + all the time + SDV: with lipth she lispeth lithpeth to him ever and ever of thow and thow all the time of thuch and thuch and thow and thow: she he she ho she ha to la: hairfiuke, if he could but twig her!

thow - thaw; thou; though + such on such and so on so

had to laugh + "Kickakick. She had to kick a laugh." [583.26] + "We'll have a brand rehearsal. Fing! One must simply laugh. Fing him aging! Good licks!" [617.16-.17]

fluke - a successful stroke made by accident or chance, an unexpected success + verflucht (ger) - accursed, damn (expl.) + He tries to grab her hair which he hopes to catch by a fluke (Joyce, Letters 13-05-1927, to Harriet Shaw Weaver).

twig - notice, understand; to beat with or as with a twig + twig = AngloIrish = to understand & twig = beat with a twig (Joyce, Letters 13-05-1927, to Harriet Shaw Weaver).

impalpable - incapable of being felt by the organs of touch; incapable of being (readily) grasped or apprehended by the mind + Manus habent et non palpabunt [Psalms 115.7 (Vulgate Psalms 113.7)] - "They have hands, but they handle not...." (Joyce, Letters 13-05-1927, to Harriet Shaw Weaver) + SDV: he is impalpabunt, he abhears.

abhor - to hate utterly, loathe + ab- - position away from + abear (Archaic) - to tolerate + 'His ear having failed, he clutches with his hand & misses & turns away hopeless and unhearing (he abhears)' (Joyce, Letters 13-05-1927, to Harriet Shaw Weaver).

buffet - a blow, stroke + buffeter - a boxer, one that buffets.

trompe - to deceive, cheat; to blow a trumpet + (pounding against the promontory of his head).

trompe (French) - elephant's trunk + trumpet + trump (at cards).

roary - given to roaring + Scribbledehobble, 6: "3 waves of I[reland] = Thoth, Ruri, Cleeva." These waves sound round the Irish coast in recognition of a great hero. Irish waves are sometimes four (i.e. the Waves of Rory, Tuath, Cleena and Scina).

hoosh - an exclamation used in driving animals

hawhaw - ha ha + SDV: The soundwaves are his buffeteers: They trompe him with their trompes: the wave of roaring and the wave of hooshed and the wave of bawahawrd and the wave of dontmindthesefelowsbutlistentome neverheedthemhorseluggarsandlistletomine. 

landlocked - shut in or enclosed by land; almost entirely surrounded by land, as a harbour, etc. + Lochlann (Anglo-Irish) - Scandinavian.

per- - thoroughly, completely + perpetuated in his offspring.

offspring - the progeny which springs or is descended from some one, children + Aufsprung (ger) - bound, leap.

sabe - expertness in particular field, knowhow, intelligence + babe - baby + Psalms 8:2: 'babes and sucklings'.

piper - one who plays on a pipe (esp. a strolling musician) + morning papers + SDV: Perpetrified in his offsprung, the moaning pipes piper tells could tell him to his face faceback how only butt for him his old butt there would not be a spier on the town or a vestal in the dock, no, nor a you yew nor an eye wilbud to play catch clash cash cash in old nilbud new by swamplight nor a'toole a'tall a'tall and noddy hint to the convaynience.

loathly - highly offensive, arousing aversion or disgust + County Louth.

loaf - Obs. exc. dial. Bread + 'leb (Serbian) - bread + Leib (ger) - body, used also in religious sense, as 'der Leib des Herrn', the body of Christ.

devoro (l) - I swallow, I devour.

butt = halibut - flatfish + but

halibut - a northern marine food fish that is the largest of the flatfishes + holy butt + SDV: how only butt for him his old butt

pudor - modesty, due sense of shame + puder (German) - powder + powder puff.

puff - breath, a short impulsive blast of breath or wind, a scornful gesture

life + libas (gr) - stream + Liebe (ger) - love + liber (l) - wine.

biff - whack, blow + biffin - a cooking apple + but

tiddy - small, very small, tiny

windfall - something blown down by the wind, like fruit from the tree + (notebook 1922-23): 'windfalls (apples)' Irish Times 30 Oct 1922, 2/5: 'There has been a wonderful crop of apples this year... those that have fallen off in the late storms. "Windfalls," when gathered fresh, may be used in making tarts or puddings'.

bread and water - the type of extreme hard fare, as of a prisoner or a penitent

holey - full of holes + According to legend, the Holy Lance (also known as the Spear of Destiny, Holy Spear, Lance of Longinus, Spear of Longinus or Spear of Christ) is the name given to the lance that pierced Jesus while he was on the cross.

Spier (ger) - thin stalk

vestal - a virgin, a chaste woman; prostitute (Slang) + vessel - any structure designed to float upon and traverse the water for the carriage of persons or goods.

flout - to mock, jeer + floating

plein (French Slang) - drunk

avowal - an act of avowing; declaration; unconstrained admission or confession + vowels - u, i, a, o, e + plein voiles (fr) - in full sail.

yew - you