missus - wife, mistress

Guinevere - Arthur's queen, Lancelot's mistress + queen of Eire. 

arrah - an expletive expressing emotion or excitement + TDV: And it's herself that's fine too, don't be talking, and fond of the concertina of an evening: Her hair's as brown as ever it was. And wivvy and wavy. Repose you now! Finn no more! 

shirk - to evade (a person, his conversation, acquaintance, etc.) + shake hands

longa (Beche-la-Mar: Melanesian pidgin) - to

grass widow - a woman who has been deserted by her husband

plenty + healthy.

dibble - to make holes in the ground + devil a hap'orth (Anglo-Irish) - not a halfpennyworth.

hayfork - a long-handled fork used for turning over hay to dry, or in pitching and loading it

lex - law + lek (Serbian) - medicine (i.e. 'presents' which ALP gives her children in ch 8) + "The 'Lex Salica', the Frankish Salic Law, is pertinent in the context (widowhood) because of its pronouncements on male and female rights of descent (the passing of property (in England only of real property) to the heir or heirs without disposition by will). The syntactic echo, however, is 'her leg's selig' (German: 'happy'). That is to say, she is not sufficiently grave, as would become a recent widow. We may also find the Dutch zalig, meaning delicious, or blessed, but the word most clearly fitting the reservation of the earlier part of the sentence is Irish salach, 'dirty'. Devil a hayfork's wrong with her only her leg's dirty." (McHugh, Roland / The sigla of Finnegans wake)

bald + old.

tib cat - a female cat

does be (Anglo-Irish) - habitual present tense of 'to be'

smirk - to smile; in later use, to smile in an affected, self-satisfied, or silly manner, to simper

pollock - an highly esteemed marine food fish; Polack (a person of Polish descent: a disparaging or derisive term) + Castor and Pollux.

woolly - a woollen garment or covering

tabouret - a low seat or stool

stitch - a single movement with the needle + to stick to one's last - to keep to that work, field, etc., in which one is competent or skilled.

enchantment - alluring or overpowering charm; enraptured condition

nester - one that nests (as a bird)

flue - chimney, a smoke-duct in a chimney

avalanche (Issy’s room is under the pitched roof at the top of the inn, as though it is up in the Alps) + Avalon: the Otherworld of Arthurian legend.

"It's an ill wind that blows no good" (proverb)

best of men - an epithet of the Buddha

gulden - any of various silver coins + gulden (Dutch) - golden; florin + gold and silver.

findrinny - white bronze + James Joyce, Letters I.348: letter 16/10/34 to Giorgio and Helen Joyce: 'A 30-year wedding should be called a 'findrinny' one. Findrinny is a kind of white gold mixed with silver'.

rein -  one of a pair of long straps (usually connected to the bit or the headpiece) used to control a horse + reins (Archaic) - kidneys, loins.

ribbons (Colloquial) - reins (for driving)

swoop - to move rapidly

fluttersome - given to or characterised by fluttering

second - to give support to, back up, assist, accompany

last post - bugle call at a burial or at the end of day

concertina - a portable musical instrument invented by Sir Charles Wheatstone in 1829, consisting of a pair of bellows, usually polygonal in form, with a set of keys at each end, which on being pressed admit wind to free metallic reeds.

forty winks - a short nap, esp. after dinner

colcannon - a traditional Irish dish mainly consisting of mashed potatoes with kale or cabbage + Cain and Abel.

dimpling - making of dimples + apple dumpling - a kind of pudding consisting of a mass of paste or dough, more or less globular in form, inclosing apple fruit, and boiled or baked.

Merlin - Arthurian sorcerer + Merlin chair - an invalid wheelchair invented by J.J. Merlin.

assotted - infatuated (i.e. under a spell such as might have been cast by Merlin) + asit - to sit, settle; remain sitting.

Evening World - a New York City newspaper, 1887-1931  

smart - stylish in dress, showing careful attention to details of appearence + short - short clothes.

A full-length coat or skirt is long enough to reach the lower part of a person's leg, almost to the ankles. A full-length sleeve reaches a person's wrist.   

swagger - fashionable, posh, smart + swagger coat - a type of three-quarter-length woman's coat (fashionable in the 1930's).

fellah - a peasant in Arabic-speaking countries; fellow

Fez - town in Morocco

Stormont - suburb of Belfast, the site of the Parliament of Northern Ireland

stilla (it) - drop + stella (it) - star.

going away - (of clothes) designed for wear when leaving on honeymoon

Vanity Fair - a place or scene where all is frivolity and empty show

rosy - healthy, blooming, tending to promote optimism

Ding (ger) - thing + Dick, Tom, Harry.

noise - to report, rumour, to spread rumours; to make a noise, to talk loudly

chuckle - quiet laugh

Selskar Gunn (1883-1944) - son of Michael Gunn and Bessie Sudlow, friend of Joyce. In Danish, elskere means "lovers."

pervenche (fr) - periwinkle 

viv (Danish) - wife

bluebell - a plant with flowers shaped like bells

salty - containing or impregnated with salt

sepulchre - grave

zee - "z" + the end + zee (Dutch) - sea + see (i.e. cross-reference to the end of the book).

silver ash - a tall perennial woody plant having a main trunk and branches forming a distinct elevated crown

switch - a coil of false hair, worn by women as a hair-supplement

flare - to burn with a spreading, unsteady flame, as when blown by the wind

anastasis (gr) - resurrection

how are you! (Anglo-Irish phrase) - don't be absurd! + The Letter: how are you.

Worth, Charles (1825-95) - dressmaker, born in Lincolnshire + Worter (ger) - words + worther = comp. of worth (worthy of, having a value of).

waist - the portion of the trunk of the human body that is between the ribs and the hip-bones + worth her weight.

noblest - superl. of noble + noble - illustrious by rank, title, or birth.

James Adam - auctioneer, had offices at 17 Merrion Row and 19 Stephen's Green. The only auctioneer on Wood Quay in the early 20th century was John Bentley. 

actionnaire (French) - shareholder ('sharestutterers' FW 027.35) + would-be auctioneers.

John 8:11: 'sin no more'

be = by + TDV: And be the hooky salmon sammon there's a big rody lad now at random on the premises, I am as it's told me, flourishing like a lord mayor (on for show), the height of a brewer's Brewster's chimpney, humphing his showlders like he's such a grandfallar with a pockedwife in pickle that's a flyfire and three sly little lice nittle clinkers, two twin twilling bugs and one midget pucell pucelle, and either he did what you know or he did not what you know with weep the clouds alone for [weeping smiling] witnesses and that'll do now but however that may be 'tis sure for one thing that he, overseen as we thought him, came to at this place some time or another in a hull of a wherry and has been repeating himself like fish ever since an as also for all batin the bulkihead, [he bloats about, the that innebbiate,] that he was of humile commune & ensectuous from nature, as his you may guess from after his byname, & that he is he & no other he who is primarily responsible will be ultimendly respunchable for the high hall cost of everything.

namesake (a namesake is named for someone else; a same-sake is named for himself or herself)

sib - sibling + sibling substitute (i.e. a twin or doppelganger) + (stutter).

hooky - covered with hooks + hook - a fish-hook, an angle + holy sermon

rody = ruddy - having a fresh red complexion + TDV: there's a big rody lad

ram - a male sheep; a sexually aggressive man, a lecher + ram (Hebrew) - high, tall + Shakespeare, Othello 1.1.88-9: "an old black ram / is tupping your white ewe" + (Tristram).

at random - without restraint, at great speed, without consideration, care, or control; at any range other than point-blank (obs.)

premise - a proposition upon which an argument is based or from which a conclusion is drawn; (Business/Commerce) pl.: a piece of land together with its buildings, esp considered as a place of business.