Humpty Dumpty 

sat on a wall,

Humpty Dumpty

had a great fall.

All the king’s horses,

And all the king’s men,

Couldn’t put Humpty

together again.

 


    “Humpty Dumpty” referred to King Richard III, the hunchbacked monarch. At the Battle of Bosworth Field, he fell from his steed, a horse he had named “Wall” (as dramatically rendered in Shakespeare’s play “Richard III”: “A horse! A horse! My Kingdom for a Horse!”) Richard was surrounded by enemy troops in the battle, and was butchered right there, his body being hacked to pieces. Hence the final part of the rhyme: “All the King’s Horses and All the King’s men couldn’t put Humpty together again!”