likewise - in the like or same manner, similarly + {Speaker: *C*}

coss - the term applied to the unknown quantity (or x) of an equation, etc. + Rule of Coss - an old name for Algebra [It. regola di cosa rule of thing, the unknown quantity (the thing) being called the cosa (a translation of Arabic shai: "x" of an equation)] + cosa? (it) - what? + "The equation required to solve one of the problems presented by al-Khwarizmi bears a close resemblance to the equation defining the Golden Ratio. Al-Khwarizmi says: "I have divided ten into two parts; I have multiplied the one by ten and the other by itself, and the products were the same." Al-Khwarizmi calls the unknown shai ("the thing"). Consequently, the first line in the description of the equation obtained (for the above problem) translates to: "you multiply thing by ten; it is ten things." The equation one obtains, 10x = (10 — x)², is the one for the smaller segment of a line of length 10 divided in a Golden Ratio. The question of whether al-Khwarizmi actually had the Golden Ratio in mind when posing this problem is a matter of some dispute. Under the influence of al-Khwarizmi's work, the unknown was called "res" in the early algebraic works in Latin, translated to "cosa" ("the thing") in Italian. Accordingly, algebra itself became known as "l'arte della cosa" ("the art of the thing"). Occasionally it was referred to as the "ars magna" ("the great art"), to distinguish it from what was considered as the lesser art of arithmetic." (Mario Livio: The Golden Ratio)

Was ist? - what's wrong? + Was? Was ist? (ger) - What? What is it?

you make what name? (Beche-la-Mar) - what do you make?

between sun and sun - from sunrise to sunset + Yeats: A Vision 231 (book III, sec. VII): 'The Spirit is still unsatisfied, until after the third state, which corresponds to Gemini, called the Shiftings where the spirit is purified of good and evil' (referring to the third state after death).

Yeats: A Vision 197 (book II, sec. VI): 'every month or phase when we take it as a whole is a double vortex moving from Phase 1 to Phase 28, or two periods, one solar and one lunar, which in the words of Heraclitus "live each other's death, die each other's life"'.

all but - almost, very nearly, well nigh

rickets or rachitis - childhood disease caused by deficiency of vitamin D and sunlight associated with impaired metabolism of calcium and phosphorus + Yeats: A Vision 298 (book V, sec. V): 'Charles Ricketts, my education in so many things'.

as to - as it regards, so far as it concerns, with respect or reference to

Somnium Scipionis (l) - "The Dream of Scipio": a dream-vision written by the Roman philosopher Marcus Tullius Cicero in which Publius Cornelius Scipio Aemilianus meets his grandfather by adoption, Publius Cornelius Scipio Africanus (236 BC - 184 BC), hero of the Second Punic War against Hannibal's Carthage. In the brief but compressed work Scipio Aemilianus travels through the planetary spheres. Digressions upon cosmology, dream-interpretation, prophecy, time-cycles, geography and doctrine upon the nature of the soul are included in it as well as advancing Pythagorean thought and the idea of the Music of the Spheres + sciupone (it) - spendthrift.

gazet - a Venetian coin of small value + gazed

Murphy = illiterate perversion of Morpheus - the god of dreams (popularly often taken as the god of sleep) + Ulysses.16.1727: 'wrapped in the arms of Murphy' + morphe (gr) - form, shape + Murphy (Slang) - potato.

myria - with the meaning 'ten thousand', in names of weights and measures of the metric system

milia (pl.) (l) - thousand[s] + mille (l) - a thousand (paces), a mile + meila murder (Anglo-Irish) - great commotion (literally 'a thousand murders', from Irish: míle marbhadh).

lazily - in a lazy manner; without energy or spirit, sluggishly

lapis - Short for: med.L. lapis philosophicus, philosophers' stone; lapis lazuli, a complex silicate containing sulphur, of bright blue colour, used as a pigment + lapis (l) - lead pencil; stone.

uter (l) - (1) skin-bag, bottle; (2) which of two + uterus (l) - womb + (marginal notes change sides).

interplay - reciprocal play, free interaction; mutual operation of two things or agents in influencing each other's action or character + Jacob and Easu struggled in the womb (Genesis 25:22).

vieo (l) - I twist together + lapis via (l) - philosophers' stone + Views of Dublin (German von: of) + {*A*'s bottom seen from lavatory bowl}

thousand + Thomas Moore: song: 'Twas One of Those Dreams [air: The Song of the Woods].

darky - the night (slang.); Also darkie: A Black, esp. a Southern U.S. Black; a dark-lantern.

ding - an imitation of the ringing sound of a heavy bell + Ding (ger) - thing.

the wood

turnpike - a barrier placed across a road to stop passage till the toll is paid; a toll-gate + TURNPIKE - The Dublin turnpike system was introduced in the reign of George II. An 1821 map shows 10 Dublin turnpikes, almost all located on the North Circular Road and South Cicrcular Road at the crossing of main roads. The turnpike in Chapelizod was just East of the Phoenix Tavern (where the Mullingar House now stands) at the curve of the Dublin road to the bridge. It is described on the 1st page of Le Fanu's House by the Churchyard. The Dublin-Mullingar road was a turnpike road until 1853 + REFERENCE

Ulme (ger) - elm + Albert Einstein was born at Ulm + "One glance, however, before you go, you will vouchsafe at the village tree—that stalworth elm. It has not grown an inch these hundred years. It does not look a day older than it did fifty years ago, I can tell you. There he stands the same;" (Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu: The House by the Churchyard).

MEARINGSTONE - Through the 17th century, "mearing stones" marked the mears (boundaries) of municipal land and liberties + méar (Irish) - finger + Aill-na-Mirem (Irish) - Stone of Divisions + Mearing Stone - stone in a wall 100 yards south of Dublin Castle, on the right bank of the Liffey river. 

foreground - that part of a view which is in front and nearest the observer; esp. as represented in a picture

Drom Conaire (drum kunere) (gael) - Conaire's (masc. personal name) Ridge; N. Dublin district; anglic. Drumcondra + Traum (ger) - dream.

butterflies

Lynch, Anne - a Dublin brand of tea (see Ulysses, 659) + Mark Twain: Huckleberry Finn 16: 'Give a nigger an inch an' he'll take an ell' give him an inch and he'll take an ell - i.e. undue advantage will be taken of a slight concession. 

jawbreaking - hard to pronounce + algebraical.

Newton, Sir Isaac (1642-1727) - English natural philosopher, author of the Principia and Universal Arithmetic (his name for algebra) + Sarah laughed when God said she was to bear a child at age ninety, hence name Isaac (means 'he laughed'; Genesis 21:5-6). 

Todhunter, Isaac (1820-84) - English mathematician whose texts were widely used in English schools + Tod (ger) - death.  

pontifex - a member of the principal college of priests in ancient Rome; Eccl. A bishop; spec. the pope + pontifex (l) - chief priest.

Burtt, Edwin Arthur - author of The Metaphysical Foundations of Modern Physical Science

specious - Of mathematical notation and computation: Performed by means of letters. Of a quantity, an equation, etc.: Denoted or expressed by a letter or letters. Opposed to numerical.

arithmetic - the science of numbers; the art of computation by figures + aristos (gr) - best + mystikos (gr) - connected with the mysteries + aristomystikos (gr) - connected with the best mysteries.

unsaid - not said or uttered + aside

vortex - a rapid movement of particles of matter round an axis; a whirl of atoms, fluid, or vapour + It was Pound who described the vortex as "the point of maximum energy" and also coined the name Vorticism + Vorticist in margin reminds of W. L., at times a mathematical painter (Glasheen, Adaline / Third census of Finnegans wake)

sprung rhythm - a term coined by Gerard Manley Hopkins (1844-89) for a poetic metre used by him which approximates to the rhythm of speech and in which each foot consists of one stressed syllable either alone or followed by a varying number of unstressed syllables; hence applied to verse, etc., using this metre.

vertex - Geom. The point opposite to the base of a (plane or solid) figure.

ha ha - the ordinary representation of laughter

ante man - Cards. The 'eldest hand' in the game of poker + ante (l) - before, prior to + ante annum (l) - before the year.

apt - suited, fitted, adapted (to (obs.) or for a purpose); having the requisite qualifications

ape - to imitate, mimic (pretentiously, irrationally, or absurdly)

aunty - A familiar, endearing form of aunt. In U.S.: 'A familiar term, often used in accosting an elderly woman.'

give rise to - to occasion, to bring about, to cause

lo - Look! See! Behold! + lo (lo) (gael) - water + ló (Irish Archaic) - day.

la la - To sing or say the syllable la repeatedly, esp. in place of the words or notes of a tune; Also trans., to sing (a song) in this way + la (la) (gael) - day.

ai = ay - Ah! O! + ai (Chinese) - to love + aiaiaiai (Portuguese) - alas. 

'tis - abbreviation of it is

lend us