"corncob" pipes made from corn cobs are cheap and effective, even if some regard them as inelegant. The cobs are first dried for two years. Then they are hollowed out to make a bowl shape. (PICTURE)

court - to pay amorous attention to, pay addresses to, woo + FDV: You are It is strictly requested that no pipesmoking, spitting, loudtalk pubtalk, sparring matches, noisy coarse kissing courtship, smut etc will take place herein hereinunder during the hours devoted to repose.

smut - indecent or obscene language

Joyce's note: 'all the privacy that secrecy cd secure'

non (l) - not

coram - a Latin preposition meaning 'before, in the presence of' + FDV: On no account also should must water of any sort description be discharged against into the grate or out of the window.

ex (l) - 'out of'

divorce - fig. To put away, remove, dispel + FDV: Do not Never forget divorce your aim in the bedding [the gloves glove that gives may will give you away.

bedding - a collective name for the articles which compose a bed, esp. the mattress, feather-bed, or other article lain upon, and the bed-clothes

(condom)

give away - orig. U.S. slang. To betray, expose (oneself, another person) to detection or ridicule; to let slip (a secret), esp. through carelessness or stupidity.

maud - black woolen fabric (worn in southern Scotland); a hag, beldam + (maid will find it while making bed).

ninny - a simpleton, a fool + FDV: [The maid may say nay but she's sure to tell her mother & then Kate Strong of the chores will get it & [on the spot.]]]

blab - to tell, or reveal indiscreetly

Omama (ger) - grandmother

besom - implement for sweeping [.09] + bosom friend - a specially intimate or beloved friend.

chore - 'a small piece of domestic work'; Formerly dial. and U.S., but more recently used colloq. of a piece of (time-consuming) drudgery.

madeleine - a (kind of) small rich cake baked in a shell-shaped tin. Sometimes (with allusion to Proust's Swann's Way I. 61 ''And suddenly the memory returns. The taste was that of the little crumb of madeleine my aunt Léonie used to give me, dipping it first in her own cup of tea'') taken as typical of something that strongly evokes memories or nostalgia. Also, in English cooking, a kind of baked pudding or small fancy cake.

ignorant - an ignorant person (Now rare.)

mostly - for the most part, in the main

corporator - a member of a corporation, esp. of a municipal corporation

Hambledon - Hampshire village noted for cricket team in 18th century + "have you heard of one Humpty Dumpty?" [045.01]

met

Bushe, Charles Kendal - legal light of 19th-century Dublin and author of Cease Your Funning (title is a song from The Beggar's Opera) + Burning Bush (Moses).

maudlin - characterized by tearful sentimentality, mawkishly emotional, weakly sentimental

give (a man) his due - (fig.): to treat him or speak of him with justice, to do justice to any merits he may possess

Ding (ger) = ding (Dutch) - thing + thing or two.

thence - from that place, from there; from that, as a source, origin, or cause

laundress - a woman whose occupation it is to wash and 'get up' linen; whore (Slang)

muddle - to bathe or wallow in mud or muddy water; to mix up blunderingly or sophistically, to confuse together

maggie - a girl; In full, Maggie Ann (also Maggy Anne): Margarine + maggie (Slang) - whore.

bawneen - In Ireland: a sleeved waistcoat made from undyed flannel worn by farm-labourers + bawn (Anglo-Irish) = ban (ban) (gael) - white, fair, pretty.

Madge - pet-name for Margaret + Madge Ellis - Dublin music-hall performer (ca. 1903) at whom a gang of students threw a corset.

brownie - a good natured goblin; a sweet bread made with brown sugar and currants + browny - inclining to brown.

Mag - playful shortening of the female name Margaret

ditcher - one who makes and repairs ditches

dastard - a mean, base, or despicable coward; in modern use, esp. one who does malicious acts in a cowardly, skulking way, so as not to expose himself to risk + bitch's bastard.

mulct - to extract money from (someone) by fine or taxation, to penalize by fining or demanding forfeiture + (notebook 1924): 'mulcted' Connacht Tribune 16 Feb 1924, 5/3: 'Licensing Law. Publican Mulcted Three Times Within a Year': 'At Galway District Court... Mrs. Sarah Flaherty... was charged... with a breach of the licensing regulations' + milkman.

rent - a large tear in a garment or piece of woven stuff; a tenant's regular payment to a landlord for the use of property or land

foreclose - to close beforehand, to answer or settle by anticipation; Law of Mortgage. To bar or exclude (the person entitled to redeem) upon non-payment of money due.

aback - in a position to the rear, in that which is behind, in a backward position

in arrears - behind in the discharge of duties or liabilities; in indebtedness, in debt

homelet - a tiny or diminutive home + Hamlet not Othello.

hotel + brothel + FDV: Ours is a house houselet not a hottle hothel.

FDV: That's right, old old ones.

FDV: Everything in fact is now about as normal all all right all (of old) right as anything in very old place. Were he, [when hwen] called calded of a that cock, to beat by the bounds by here at such a point of time as this is with upheld caboosh caboosh upheld [for thrushes' mistiles [singing [up] his morgingroad parasang mean fathery easta eastan applecelery]] pollysigh patrolman Seekasun, crumbling [quiet] down from his hoonger, would perceive, unless he were [neverso] mistaking, no goodfordomt goodfourdawmed goodforedawmed appearances ereshiningem of light at through any of their thuncle's windows windopes. And More, if he brought his boots to pause in peace the one beside the other one, right on the road, he would hear no sound on either side except from cache or beyond the flow of water what wand was gypsing water telling him now telling him all, about allabout ham and livery, stay and toast ham and livery, and buttermon & murmurlade murmurlate and bacon quaker to waker oats and with ham on livery. Or that wind then mong them treen.

irgendwas (ger) - anything

scald - to produce an injurious effect upon (something) similar to that produced by boiling water + FDV: Were he, [when hwen] called calded of a that cock,

curfew + couvre-feu (fr) - curfew + couver (fr) - hatch.

beat the bounds - to trace out the boundaries of a parish, in the presence of witnesses, by striking key points with a stick + (notebook 1924): 'beating the bounds'.

sammel (ger) - to gather + Sammael - in Jewish folklore, the enemy of God against whom Michael wars eternally + for at samle op (Danish) - to gather together. 

William Wood produced in 1724 copper coinage for Ireland as a swindle (Swift wrote tirades against 'Wood's halfpence').

rivier (Dutch) - river

argent (fr) - money

gang - any band or company of persons who go about together or act in concert + halvtredsindstyve (Danish) - fifty (literally 'half-three times twenty').

multiplied + multo plus (l) - by much more.

allto - Employed in middle and early modern Eng. as an intensive to any verb.

fiver - a five-pound note. In U.S. a five-dollar note + (notebook 1924): 'with ten off 3 twenty & 7 on top of that = 57'.

deuce - slang. Twopence.

roamer - one who roams; a wanderer, rambler + Roamers - Mr Hart says, well-known watchmakers + Römer (ger) - Roman. 

LVII + "That is to say: '3:30, plus 20 minutes, plus 5 minutes, plus 2 minutes - the minute hand being therefore two minutes past the Roman XI (elf, in German) on the clockface: 3:57 a.m.' That 3:30 should be defined as 'half back from three' is attributable to the general reversibility of time in this Book.); Also, in Roman: L+V+II = LVII" (Hart, Clive / Structure and motif in Finnegans wake) + Joyce's note: 'ell' + (notebook 1924): 'Lvii'.

caboose - a hut or poor dwelling; a cooking-oven or fireplace erected on land + caboche (fr) - head + caubeen (Irish) - old hat + FDV: to beat by the bounds by here at such a point of time as this is with upheld caboosh caboosh upheld

missiles (excrement) + mistle thrush.

oud - a form of lute or mandolin played principally in Arab countries + out + oud (Dutch) - old.

parasang - Persian measure of length, usually comparable to the European league + para (Turkish) - money + FDV: [for thrushes' mistiles [singing [up] his morgingroad parasang mean fathery easta eastan applecelery]]

Cornish - the ancient language of Cornwall, a member of the Brythonic branch of the Celtic languages; it became extinct in the latter part of the 18th c.

token - characteristic, expression

Eastend - the easterly extremity of anything. In mod. use often spec. the eastern part of London.

APPENZELL - East canton of Switzerland. Fritz Senn has recorded this song, in Appenzeller dialect: 'Min Vatter ischt en Appenzeller / Er frisst de Chas mit samt em Teller.' ("My father is from Appenzell / He eats up the cheese and the plate as well.") 

(onomat. of a yodelling refrain of 'Min Vatter ischt en Appenzeller', sung after every line)

Polizei (ger) - police + FDV: pollysigh patrolman Seekasun,

patrolman - a policeman on patrol duty

Sackerson - name of the Man Servant; Seker or Sokar is a falcon god of the Memphite necropolis + Senn (ger) - cowherd + "the 'patrolman Seekersenn', peering (583.24) at the window behind which ALP and HCE make love" (John Gordon: Finnegans wake: a plot summary)

towney = towny - of, pertaining to, or characteristic of the town; townish.

tanquam - something that has only an apparent existence, a mere seeming

Crom-ghlinn (krumlin) (gael) - Curved Valley; S. Dublin district, anglic. Crumlin

hunger + honger (Dutch) - hunger + hoon (Dutch) - scorn + FDV: crumbling [quiet] down from his hoonger,

mac - a mild oath + mac (mok) (gael) -son.

siccar - assuredly, certainly + mach' sicher (ger) = mak siccar (Archaic) - make sure + sikker af intet gudsfordømt (Danish) - certain of no goddamned.

Erscheinungen (ger) - apparitions + Gottverdammte Erscheinungen (ger) - accursed apparitions + FDV: would perceive, unless he were [neverso] mistaking, no goodfordomt goodfourdawmed goodforedawmed appearances ereshiningem of light

turkling = turtling - the action or occupation of 'fishing' for or catching turtle + through + Turkey.

either one

dunkel (ger) - dark + uncle's windows + FDV: at through any of their thuncle's windows windopes.

never so - especially, particularly; In conditional clauses, denoting an unlimited degree or amount.

mistaken

cache - a hiding place, esp. of goods, treasure, etc. + FDV: And More, if he brought his boots to pause in peace the one beside the other one, right on the road, he would hear no sound on either side except from cache or beyond the flow of water what wand was gypsing water

what + Wand (ger) - wall + vand (Danish) - water.

livery - the dispensing of food, provisions, or clothing to retainers or servants; hence gen., provision, allowance + Anna Livia.

tay (Irish Pronunciation) - tea + FDV: telling him now telling him all, about allabout ham and livery, stay and toast ham and livery,

marmalade